Using a ShuttlePro with Kdenlive

I bought a little hand friendly thing with a lot of buttons and wheels – a Jog-Shuttle called “Contour ShuttlePro v2”. It’s supposed to make video editing a lot easier by putting most of the functions you need on the fingertips on one hand. With mouse and keyboard there is a lot of moving around.
I got a bit of trouble while setting it up – so here is my write up for later reference – perhaps mostly for me after a reinstall.

Getting Kdenlive to recognize it

Out of the box some key work as mouse buttons and the wheel acts as a mouse wheel. The other buttons do nothing. But Kdenelive doesn’t find it.

I followed the manual and set up an udev rule. Get root and create the file /etc/udev/rules.d/90-contour-shuttleXpress.rules . Put this line into it:

SUBSYSTEMS=="usb", ATTRS{idVendor}=="0b33", ATTRS{idProduct}=="0030", MODE="0444"

Now we have to find the device address. Open a console and enter

fgrep Contour -A4 /proc/bus/input/devices

My output was:

N: Name="Contour Design ShuttlePRO v2"
P: Phys=usb-0000:00:1a.0-1.1/input0
S: Sysfs=/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1a.0/usb3/3-1/3-1.1/3-1.1:1.0/0003:0B33:0030.0001/input/input3
U: Uniq=
H: Handlers=mouse0 event0

The event0 in the last line is the number to be entered at Kdenlives dialog – in my case as /dev/input/event0.

Now Kdenlive found the thing an I could set up some keys. (Findig a good keymapping is another thing….. ) But the wheel made funny stuff – like the mouse wheel. Somehow Kdenlive got the events in duplicate – as mouse wheel and jog-shuttle. Chaos.

In a mailing list I found the solution: disable xinput for this thing. Look for the device by

xinput --list

I found the line

   ↳ Contour Design ShuttlePRO v2 id=8 [slave  pointer  (2)]

And with the line

xinput set-int-prop 8 "Device Enabled" 8 0

I got rid of it in xinput. The first 8 is the id of the device, the second one is magic.  😉

Now it works like a charm.

 

 

Episode 201: OPSEC!

Download the video! (21:44, 43MB)
The companion file! (51MB)

Nearly all colour laser printers leave a pattern of tiny yellow dots all over the paper. These dots contain information about the printer and perhaps also about the time and date of the print, the IP of your computer and who knows what else. These codes are in there for at least a decade and the EFF has complained in vain. Reality Winner got cought with these dots – but perhaps they would have found out about her a bit later without them.

The EFF has a dorky video about that.

I have a laser printer in my office at school. What does it tell about me? I research that with help of GIMP 2.9 – which looks terrific and has a lot of nice new stuff on board.

And of course you get to see some of these new features.

The companion file contains the scan of the Ordnungsmaßnahmenverordung in different resolutions and the XCF file with the revealed code. The last paragraph on the page gives me the right to take away your phone and hand it back to your parents after a reasonable time – if it beeps again in my class. (A lot of kids would prefer the cane over this….  😉 )

I forgot about the serial number of the printer – this will be updated soon.

The TOC:

00:00:00 Intro

00:00:50 Leaking from the NSA
00:01:35 Little yellow dots on laser print
00:03:00 Gimp 2.9 fired up
00:03:30 Search for the yellow dots
00:04:20 Colour Channels
00:06:00 Extract a colour component
00:06:40 Split view – new in filter dialogs
00:07:15 Searching for the pattern
00:07:55 New things in the layer dialog
00:08:30 Searching for the pattern
00:10:10 Crop tool
00:10:30 Measuring the pattern
00:11:35 Adding a precise grid
00:12:45 30 bytes of data in the yellow dots!
00:14:00 What’s not in the code?
00:15:00 Printing leaves traces
00:16:25 Blunder of “The Intercept”
00:17:00 Anonymising a scan with the threshold tool
00:18:30 The mono mixer for getting red back in
00:20:00 Return of the Minox for leakers?
00:21:00 We need a guide about OPSEC!
00:21:44 End of video

Meet the GIMP Video Podcast by Rolf Steinort is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at https://meetthegimp.org.

How does the “Ghetto Pinhole” stand up to German Engineering?

On Sunday I took my aluminium foil pinhole and a “Monochrom Subjektiv Pancake” (link in German to a shop – I get nothing from them) with a laser drilled pinhole to the Weser and took some shots.

I’ll show the Subjektiv in the next episode in detail. The pinhole has a diameter of 0.28mm and a whopping 1/f=159. My aluminium foil should have about 1/f=240.

And now compare:

“Ghetto” (3 sec exposure – JPG direct out of the camera)

“Subjektiv” (2 sec exposure – JPG direct out of the camera)

“Subjektiv” (2 sec exposure – JPG direct out of the camera)

“Ghetto” (3 sec exposure – JPG direct out of the camera)

Not really bad for a quick hack!

The Subjektiv has 3 much more elaborate and fancy lenses – so this was really unfair…….

Episode 200: Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day

tip of the pin
Download the Video! (7:15, 63MB)

And here is the mythical Episode 200 – in a quite different form than planned. Years later, shabby audio and short. I am still on a steep conversion course with my workflow – and completely out of routine. Even the video is partly out of focus….

This Sunday (tomorrow!) is the Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day.

In the video I demonstrate a quick and dirty way to convert an expensive digitial camera to a cheap quality pinhole camera.

Episode 201 will cover the background for this stuff – but this has to go up now!
Meet the GIMP Video Podcast by Rolf Steinort is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://meetthegimp.org.

I am back!

Life threw some interesting stuff in my direction – mostly positive – that consumed a lot of my time and attention. But now I have some capacity to come back to this project.

It will take some time for the next video. First I have to rebuild my production pipeline – and that is an interestimg task too. My favorite video editor Cinelerra crashes all the time – I have to learn Blender for editing. And then there is the screen recording with a lot of newoptions and some nice new ways to encode video…..

New Krita Videos – and a Kickstarter to help Krita

Ramón Miranda has published 4 short Krita tutorial videos as a support of the Kickstarter campaign to accelerate Krita development.

Krita is a Digital painting application for artists created by artists and is available for Linux and Windows. Maybe MacOS in future. It’s one of the Kickstarter goals for overfunding.

If you like Krita, throw some money at them. Money is so unpersonal, but it helps a lot. 😉 The intended 24 goals are on the web site of Kickstarter – and they look really worth to have!

Krita Kickstarter

Krita tip 01. Monotone image with Transparency Masks

Krita tip 02. Color curves with filter masks

Krita tip 03. Texturize your images. The easy way

Krita tip 04 Digital color mixer

Don’t forget that I’ll give away a copy of the Muses DVD by Ramón Miranda – if you want it, put a comment below Episode 199!

Episode 200 is under way, progress report are on the top of the side bar!

Episode 199: G’MIC

Download the Video! (33:10, 63MB)

No Companion File!

Watch at YouTube

G’MIC is a lot of things that do stuff with images. You have a stand alone program with a complete image manipulation and analysis programming language, an online service and a GIMP plugin that gives easy access to (nearly) the whole package. Don’t get G’MIC from other sources than their pages – the update cycle is so fast that package maintainers can’t keep up. The version recorded in the video is already outdated twice at the time of the publication.

G’MIC is mostly developed by Dr. David Tschumperlé of the GREYC, an institute at the University of Caen in France that is also part of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (National Center for Scientific Research). So definitely no hobbyist project.

I met David and his friend and colleague Jérôme – also a scientist AKA Dr. Jérôme Boulanger – at the LGM in Leipzig. Very nice guys! See Pat David’s wonderful blog post for more images and a report.

You can find information about G’MIC at their site in the very good and complete manual, at YouTUBE from G’MIC and David, at Pat David’s Blog and all over the Internets.

The second part of the video is a promotion for Ramón Miranda‘s very good training DVD “Muses”. It goes through the whole process of learning Krita – a graphics program under Linux and Windows, which is much better for painters than GIMP – up to finishing a real digital painting. You can buy the DVD at the Krita shop, 32.50€ is comparable to other kinds of such DVDs and the proceeds support the Krita Foundation.

I got this one for free – and I will give it away! If you want to have it, write a comment to this blog post before Episode 200 is published. Get your mail address right (it will only be visible to me) and mention that you want the DVD. After the deadline I’ll have some supposedly innocent children draw a winner.

The TOC

00:00:00 Start of video
00:01:10 Installing the G’MIC Plugin for GIMP
00:03:00 Installing and using G’MIC as a stand alone program
00:10:00 G’MIC Online service
00:10:40 Using the G’MIC GIMP Plugin
00:13:40 Pencil Drawing emulation as an example
00:18:10 Film emulations and grain as an example
00:25:15 Spectral filters – Fourrier included
00:26:20 Plotting Graphs with G’MIC
00:26:50 Conclusion
00:29:20 Ramon Miranda’s Krita tutorial DVD
00:33:10 EOF

Meet the GIMP Video Podcast by Rolf Steinort is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://meetthegimp.org.

Episode 198: Darktable revisited

Download the Video! (42:00, 80 MB)

No Companion File!

Watch at YouTube

darktable is an open source photography workflow application and RAW developer. A virtual lighttable and darkroom for photographers. It manages your digital negatives in a database, lets you view them through a zoomable lighttable and enables you to develop raw images and enhance them.”

I cant say it better than this bit from their page.

I had tested darktable in 2010 and found it promising – but stayed with f-spot and later Shotwell. But now I’ll switch to darktable.

These 42 minutes are a rigorously cut down version of my nearly 2 hours long walk through darktable – I was distracted so much by the endless modules and possibilities that I forgot the time. This will not be my last darktable video, I’ll try to focus a bit more on usable stuff in them. 😉

You can find Pascal’s videos at pcode.nl, you have to search a bit for them.

And here is a collection of darktable videos, recommended by our Bert (rayadagio).

The TOC

00:00:00 Start and book savings announcment
00:02:32 Darktable startup
00:03:50 Importing images and grouping them
00:06:10 Copying and moving images
00:09:00 XMP files
00:10:30 Tagging
00:11:35 Geotagging
00:15:00 Rating and marking images on the Zoomable lighttable
00:16:20 The manual
00:18:30 The darkroom
00:21:00 The interactive histogram
00:21:40 Undo with the history stack
00:22:20 Lots of modules
00:25:40 Cropping and rotating
00:27:00 Zooming in the darkroom
00:29:30 Non destructive editing
00:30:20 Levels and curves
00:32:30 Stacking curves (and other modules)
00:33:20 Color correction
00:34:20 Monochrome conversion with color filters
00:35:30 Correction lens errors and lots more modules
00:39:00 Exporting the image
00:42:00 EOF

Meet the GIMP Video Podcast by Rolf Steinort is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://meetthegimp.org.

No Starch Press GIMP Books 30% off!

Aside

You know that I like the No Starch Press GIMP books – I even had my hand in the production of one of them. The other is always in reach at my desk. Over at Reddit there is a coupon code for getting 30% off of them – valid until May 6.

(I once got some $$$ and a crate of books from them for doing a technical review, but this is not paid by anyone for.)