Episode 111: All Ducks in a Row!

What the Duck!
The align tool is not very visible in the toolbox, but can be very handy for arranging text or several layers. I use it for example to tile map snippets that I have copied from the web.

Before you despair while using this tool, think about where you align to. What is you anchor and how do you want to place your snippets. Then you’ll find a sequence of steps to get to your result. This needs a bit thinking but beats moving with the move tool any time.

If you watch these videos with a mobile device you should consider to switch the feed to the new MOBILE feed. And I still need help with iTunes! Apple locks Linux users out of the system – and I will not install Windows here.

If you are a photographer, you have to go over to WTF WTD – What the Duck! A daily comic about photography. It’s a must.

The TOC

00:19 Welcome
00:25 The new mobile feed
03:17 The Align tool
03:49 Create some layers to try the tool on
06:00 Moving layers using the move tool
06:40 Centering a layer using the align tool
08:00 Aligning layers to each other
08:50 Distributing layers
09:30 Selecting layers using the rubber-band select
11:00 Summary
13:19 Reminder about the mobile feed
14:46 The End

Creative Commons License
Meet the GIMP Video Podcast by Rolf Steinort and Philippe Demartin is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Germany License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://meetthegimp.org.

14 thoughts on “Episode 111: All Ducks in a Row!

  1. Here’s a go at a TOC:

    http://meetthegimp.org/episode-111-all-ducks-in-a-row/
    Episode 111: All Ducks in a Row!
    00:19 Welcome
    00:25 The new mobile feed
    03:17 The Align tool
    03:49 Create some layers to try the tool on
    06:00 Moving layers using the move tool
    06:40 Centering a layer using the align tool
    08:00 Aligning layers to each other
    08:50 Distributing layers
    09:30 Selecting layers using the rubber-band select
    11:00 Summary
    13:19 Reminder about the mobile feed
    14:46 The End

  2. Thanks for explaining the align tool. There were quite a few instances I could have made good use of it but didn’t, as I never understood its operation and have it removed from the toolbox when switching to 2.6.

    For a future show may I suggest an idea: Would it be possible to cover filter use? Not gimp filters, but real ones like the gray and pol filter?

  3. @Sebastian Filters were already explained in episodes 32 until 35. Working with digital images you dont need them anymore. Gimp can simulate the effect and you can change it all you want. If you put filters on your camera you cant change it back.

  4. I’m no pro photographer but will try to explain.
    Filters are only required when working with analog film cameras. Digital cameras do not need filters anymore because you can use gimp to emulate them or the camera itself can reproduce it internally. As today the camera cpus are fast enough most digital cameras no longer bear a filter mount on their lense.
    But there are limits, especially in gimp which has only 8 bits, you get rounding errors and lots of off-by-one. So professional photographers still use the old analog filters to get the highest possible quality. Rolf too surely uses analog filters for his non-meetthegimp work.
    Somewhat different is a uv filter. For professional closeup or portrait work there are expensive lenses with very large frontside openings and when used in bright daylight or the mountains a big amount of uv rays can enter the camera. So you need a uv protection filter. But it can have sideeffects on bright colors like snow or a wedding gown so it is not build it.

  5. I don’t agree in all points, steam 2009…
    I think if pro photographers still use analogue filters they do it for convenience (they always did so) or for challenge (they want to take the photo as it is without digital tricks). It’s not a reason of rounding errors. Most pros don’t use GIMP (and 8 bit) anyway, unfortunately.
    And, as stated by Rolf and my first post, there are some filters that can’t be emulated. That’s because they create and show details that are simply not in the files without those filters. Changing colours is easy in post-processing. But creating details is impossible.
    I am not 100% sure about those UV filters. I think all digital cameras have already one of them in front of the sensor. Therefore, you won’t need any of those in front of your lens. It will only disturb the image quality.

  6. To continue the off-topic discussion of filters:

    There’s a very nice article at http://dpfwiw.com/filters.htm that explains the various filters and their application to digital photography.

    Personally I only use UV filters to give a little extra protection to the relatively expensive glass of the lenses.

  7. Let’s see if I can get this straight. There are two types of filters. First is what I’d call “artistic filters”. These are color or gamut-changing filters are were required for b&w photographic work to get a good tonal distribution. These can, in almost all circumstances, be emulated by software today so their usage has dropped considerably.
    Second are what I name “technical filters”. It’s a much smaller group and they are still in use today, especially with digital cameras, and not only by professional but also by amateur and hobby photographers.
    The most prominent and one of the most impressive and useful ones is the polarization filter or polfilter for short. Look at Wikipedia for its workings. It can block light reflections from windows, water and even some types of fabric and plastic. It can also be used to enhance contrast when taking photos of the sky as the skys blue consists or partially polarized light and can be blocked, increasing the clouds visibility.
    Grey and neutral density (nd) filters are in reality two separate kinds of filters. Nd filters are colorless and reduce the amount of light by a certain amount which depends of the strength of the filter. They are useful when the overall light is too much for the camera to handle with a giving exposure time/aperture combination. Grey or more accurately grey gradient filters are colorless as well but reduce the light differently from one side to the other, either giving a smooth or a harsh gradient. They are used when the contrast between sky and land is too high and would result in blownout highlights when exposing the land correctly or in underexposure when measuring for the sky.
    Uv filter are mostly used just to protect the front of your lens as they are the cheapest kind of filters. They have a small use when shooting some kinds of white fabric or plastic outside in bright sunlight or in the snowy mountains but it can backfire. Most other filters, especially polfilters, have uv blocking capabilities too.

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Anything to add from your side of the computer?